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Jun 24, 2013

Show 994 NRO  National Review Online 5 Segments. The End is Near, Conscience and Its Enemies etc

 

Segment 1. The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome: How Going Broke Will Leave America Richer, Happier, and More Secure by Kevin D. Williamson. 12 minutes

 

Segment 2. Conscience and Its Enemies: Confronting the Dogmas of Our Age by Robert P. George. 10 minutes.

 

Segment 3. The Savior Generals: How Five Great Commanders Saved Wars That Were Lost-From Ancient Greece to Iraq by Victor Davis Hanson. 10 minutes

 

Segment 4. Becoming Europe: Economic Decline, Culture, and How America Can Avoid a European Future by Samuel Gregg. 10 minutes

 

Segment 5. 'Til Faith Do Us Part: The Rise of Interfaith Marriage and the Future of American Religion, Family, and Society by Naomi Schaefer Riley. 9 minutes.

 Please visit National Review Online Between the Covers for many good author interviews. The audio quality is poor but the content is good.

http://www.nationalreview.com/media/betweenthecovers

 

The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome: How Going Broke Will Leave America Richer, Happier, and More Secure by Kevin D. Williamson

 Overview-  The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome is a radical re-visioning of what government is, a powerful analysis of why it doesn't work, and an exploration of the innovative solutions spontaneously emerging thanks to the fortunate failure of politics.

 Every year, consumer goods and services get better, cheaper, and more widely available while critical necessities delivered by government grow more expensive, even as their quality declines. The reason for this paradox is simple: politics. Not bad politics, not liberal politics, not conservative politics, not politics corrupted by big money or distorted by special-interest groups, but the simple practice of delivering goods and services through federal, state, and local governments and their obsolete decision-making practices.

 National Review columnist Kevin Williamson describes the crisis of the modern welfare state in the era of globalization and argues that the crucial political failures of our time—education, health care, social security, and monetary policy—are due not to ideology but the nature of politics itself. Meanwhile, those who can't or won't turn to the state for goods and services—from homeschoolers to Wall Street to organized crime—are experimenting with replacing the outmoded social software of the state with market-derived alternatives.

 Williamson compellingly analyzes the government's numerous failures and reports on the solutions that people all over the country are discovering. You will meet homeschoolers who have abandoned public schools; see inside private courtrooms that administer the law beyond government; encounter entrepreneurs developing everything from private currencies to shadow intelligence agencies rivaling the CIA; and learn about the remarkably peaceable enforcement of justice in the allegedly lawless Wild West.

 As our outmoded twentieth-century government collapses under the weight of its own incompetence and inefficiency, Williamson points to the green shoots of the brave new world that is already being born.

  

Conscience and Its Enemies: Confronting the Dogmas of Our Age by Robert P. George

 Overview-  “Many in elite circles yield to the temptation to believe that anyone who disagrees with them is a bigot or a religious fundamentalist. Reason and science, they confidently believe, are on their side. With this book, I aim to expose the emptiness of that belief.” —From the introduction

 Assaults on religious liberty and traditional morality are growing fiercer. Here, at last, is the counterattack.

 Showcasing the talents that have made him one of America’s most acclaimed and influential thinkers, Robert P. George explodes the myth that the secular elite represents the voice of reason. In fact, George shows, it is on the elite side of the cultural divide where the prevailing views frequently are nothing but articles of faith. Conscience and Its Enemies reveals the bankruptcy of these too often smugly held orthodoxies while presenting powerfully reasoned arguments for classical virtues.

  

The Savior Generals: How Five Great Commanders Saved Wars That Were Lost-From Ancient Greece to Iraq by Victor Davis Hanson

 Overview- Leading military historian Victor Davis Hanson returns to non-fiction in The Savior Generals, a set of brilliantly executed pocket biographies of five generals who single-handedly saved their nations from defeat in war. War is rarely a predictable enterprise—it is a mess of luck, chance, and incalculable variables. Today's sure winner can easily become tomorrow's doomed loser. Sudden, sharp changes in fortune can reverse the course of war.

 These intractable circumstances are sometimes mastered by leaders of genius—asked at the eleventh hour to save a hopeless conflict, created by others, often unpopular with politics and the public. These savior generals often come from outside the established power structure, employ radical strategies, and flame out quickly. Their careers often end in controversy. But their dramatic feats of leadership are vital slices of history—not merely as stirring military narrative, but as lessons on the dynamic nature of consensus, leadership, and destiny.

 Becoming Europe: Economic Decline, Culture, and How America Can Avoid a European Future by Samuel Gregg

 Overview- “We’re becoming like Europe.” This expression captures many Americans’ sense that something has changed in American economic life since the Great Recession’s onset in 2008: that an economy once characterized by commitments to economic liberty, rule of law, limited government, and personal responsibility has drifted in a distinctly “European” direction.

 Americans see, across the Atlantic, European economies faltering under enormous debt; overburdened welfare states; governments controlling close to fifty percent of the economy; high taxation; heavily regulated labor markets; aging populations; and large numbers of public-sector workers. They also see a European political class seemingly unable—and, in some cases, unwilling—to implement economic reform, and seemingly more concerned with preserving its own privileges. Looking at their own society, Americans are increasingly asking themselves: “Is this our future?”

In Becoming Europe, Samuel Gregg examines economic culture—the values and institutions that inform our economic priorities—to explain how European economic life has drifted in the direction of what Alexis de Tocqueville called “soft despotism,” and the ways in which similar trends are manifesting themselves in the United States. America, Gregg argues, is not yet Europe; the good news is that economic decline need not be its future. The path to recovery lies in the distinctiveness of American economic culture. Yet there are ominous signs that some of the cultural foundations of America’s historically unparalleled economic success are being corroded in ways that are not easily reversible—and the European experience should serve as the proverbial canary in the coal mine.

 

 'Til Faith Do Us Part: The Rise of Interfaith Marriage and the Future of American Religion, Family, and Society by Naomi Schaefer Riley

 Overview- In the last decade, 45% of all marriages in the U.S. were between people of different faiths. The rapidly growing number of mixed-faith families has become a source of hope, encouraging openness and tolerance among religious communities that historically have been insular and suspicious of other faiths.

 Yet as Naomi Schaefer Riley demonstrates in 'Til Faith Do Us Part, what is good for society as a whole often proves difficult for individual families: interfaith couples, Riley shows, are less happy than others and certain combinations of religions are more likely to lead to divorce. Drawing on in-depth interviews with married and once-married couples, clergy, counselors, sociologists, and others, Riley shows that many people enter into interfaith marriages without much consideration of the fundamental spiritual, doctrinal, and practical issues that divide them. Couples tend to marry in their twenties and thirties, a time when religion diminishes in importance, only to return to faith as they grow older and raise children, suffer the loss of a parent, or experience other major life challenges. Riley suggests that a devotion to diversity as well as to a romantic ideal blinds many interfaith couples to potential future problems. Even when they recognize deeply held differences, couples believe that love conquers all. As a result, they fail to ask the necessary questions about how they will reconcile their divergent worldviews-about raising children, celebrating holidays, interacting with extended families, and more. An obsession with tolerance at all costs, Riley argues, has made discussing the problems of interfaith marriage taboo.

 'Til Faith Do Us Part is a fascinating exploration of the promise and peril of interfaith marriage today. It will be required reading not only for interfaith couples or anyone considering interfaith marriage, but for all those interested in learning more about this significant, yet understudied phenomenon and the impact it is having on America.

 

7 Things You Didn't Know About Interfaith Marriage

 

By Naomi Schaeffer Riley, author of 'Til Faith Do Us Part: How Interfaith Marriage is Transforming America

 

1) 42% of marriages in the U.S. are interfaith ones. Marriages between people of two different religions are becoming more common in every area of the country, and for men and women regardless of educational status or income level.

 

2) Couples in interfaith marriages are, on average, less happy than same-faith ones. In certain faith-combinations they are more likely to divorce.

 

3) Jews are the most likely to marry out and Mormons are the least likely. Muslims, Catholics and Protestants fall somewhere in the middle.

 

4) Children of interfaith couples are more than twice as likely to adopt the faith of their mother as the faith of their father.

 

5) A quarter of couples in same-faith marriages actually started off in different faith ones.

 

6) The older you are, the more likely you are to marry outside of the faith — 67% of people who marry between 36 and 45 are in interfaith marriages.

 

7) Marrying someone of another faith makes you more likely to have a positive impression of that faith as a whole.